Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘craft’

In deciding the coat I would like made for my wedding, I’ve had to do quite a bit of research.

These were the criteria for my coat:

1) Made of midnight blue velvet with sky blue silk lining
2) Something with a ‘period’ feel about it
3) Fitted at the bust and flowing past the waist with a big enough bustle to accommodate my dress

It didn’t seem easy to find exact pictures of what I wanted. So I started looking at different fashions in history for inspiration.

There was the Regency style. The pelisse was an extremely popular style. It is almost a bolero type small jacket ending under the bust in order to suit the high waisted empire dress styles of the period.

S&S Spencer-Pelisse lg

Photo Credit here

Here’s a beautiful modern interpretation of the pelisse which would be perfect for a bride.

il_fullxfull.11078879

Stand-up collar jacket by Rohm on Etsy

Amazing article on Regency coats at this Jane Austen website.

I then looked towards Edwardian fashion. I’ve already been influenced a little by the sombre Edwardian style – I think I’ll be buying an Edwardian umbrella in case of a rainy wedding day.

1
Picture source

But the fashion of that period turned out not to be at all what I was looking for (even though the magazine title for this image was ‘Incontestable Seduction’ which is very appealing!)

The Victorian period and more specifically military style outerwear turned out to be closer to what I was searching for.

qm-0609_cloak-coat_general_l

qm-0609_cloak-coat_sleeve_detail-captain_l

Although this is a men’s U.S. Officer’s Regulation Cloak Coat it has elements of what I am after. The braiding detail on the sleeve I especially love.

o_DSC03049

And I love this reproduction Victorian coat . Lots of Gothic drama!

But since I want the coat to cover my dress I want something floor length. This dress coat by Joan Shum has a great outline: fitted at the top with a large skirt.

white daliha dress frm joan shum

Details are important and I would like the front of my coat to be frogged and buttoned in military fashion which basically means it will look like this:

1254

Image source.

With my future mother-in-law’s help, we found the pattern for the coat. It is an old Vogue design by none other Oscar de la Renta. So although I can only drool over his dresses I still get a little bit of Oscar for my very own!

V2714

V2714

We’re changing the ridiculously puffy sleeves (Oscar what were you thinking?!) for something more fitted.

I’ve ordered the pattern from America and now we just have to wait till it arrives. Exciting!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Oh Style Me Pretty everything you feature is so beautiful and your brides are so clever! Just look at this pearl necklace that bride Stephanie made for her wedding.

necklace-diy-project

Stephanie got various beads from craft shops and some clear jewellery string or fishing line.

Here’s her instructions of you want to make the necklace yourself:

“My basic philosophy in going into the necklace was that I wanted it to be eclectic and sweet- so, I stuck with jewels that matched my color scheme but still added a bit of spark every now and again. Since each strand connected to a different hook, I basically just started with one layer, and as I added more, made them slightly longer or slightly shorter to layer them one right on top of the other- After each layer I was sure to hold it up to my neck to make sure they were falling properly. If you want the necklace a bit fuller- you can add more than one strand of beads to each individual hook.

The great part about an eclectic necklace is that your strands don’t have to have even numbers and matching patterns. Each strand was unique to itself- however, it is good to continually try on the necklace and have an outside opinion to make sure it is flowing smoothly and looking good on your particular neckline. I also used this necklace as a “reception necklace”- so, I felt ok about making it a little more “fun” rather than “formal”.

I added a small chain to the back so that I could adjust the length of the necklace if desired.

I used pretty basic “necklace crafting technique” and just put in a little more time and patience to create the layers.

A helpful hint: When you tie knots at the ends when you are attaching the strands from one latch to another- after tying several knots to secure the beading- Cut off the excess clear string and use a lighter to burn the very tip of the string so that it shrivels up and creates a small lump of melted plastic. This helps to secure the knot from slipping loose as well as from creating an itchy point. Don’t get the fire too close (you only need to hold it near -not directly on)- or it will burn more than desired and snap some of the base knots as well.”

Very tempted to have a go at making this necklace if not for the wedding then to wear somewhere else. So eclectic and fun!

Thanks Stephanie and Style Me Pretty. You Rock.

Read Full Post »

DSC_0098

We were lucky enough to be invited to a lovely wedding on a farm in Suffolk. Fairy lights filled the trees and twinkled in the rivers that surrounded the farm.

DSC_0011

The bride had got crafty and made most of the decorations. Bunting was created from different textures of white fabric and blue and pink fairy lights trailed the beams of the farmhouse along with homemade butterflies.

DSC_0015

DSC_0050

Each guest was given a local pickle or chutney in cute little jars tied with rose pink ribbons printed with the message ‘To have and to hold’. Get these ribbons for your own big day at Cox & Cox.

DSC_0006

Read Full Post »

cootie

Great idea from Victoria Brewer & Bill Brazell’s wedding in New York magazine. I used to play with these in primary school and love the way they’ve adapted them into something playful but good-looking

Victoria says:

“We got customized ‘cootie-catchers’ and filled them with questions we often get asked, like, ‘How tall is Bill? Six-feet-six. The Yankees or the Mets? The Red Sox …’ and so on. We thought they’d be fun conversation starters, so we scattered them on all the tables.”

Read Full Post »

dsc_0008blur

My brother is going to a wedding in Spain and received the invitation yesterday. I loved the fact that it was handmade. The bride had folded a page from a wedding magazine to make the envelope.

dsc_0003

Does it mean I have been looking at too many wedding dresses when I recognise this a Pronovias dress?

dsc_0009

Read Full Post »

1bon

When I was a little girl I can remember my Italian grandmother (or Nonna as I know her form the Italian) sitting at her table surrounded by fine netting, rolls of shiny ribbon, the smallest flowers and leaves and sugar almonds. She would cut away with scissors and bind with green florist tape to make beautiful small bouquets. It wasn’t a full time job for my nonna…she was too busy feeding up us grandkids and generally fussing over us. And besides I think she would have happily made them for free and often did as it was such a pleasure for her. She’s been waiting for the moment she can make one of her grandchildrens wedding bonboniere and finally she now has a chance.

dsc_0006

Bonboniere are Italian wedding favors. They come in all shapes and colours with different flowers and can also be used for for christenings, first communions, golden and silver anniversaries. The one thing the wedding bonboniere have in common is that traditionally they should have 5 sugared almonds. These symbolize health, wealth, happiness, fertility and long life. When the bride and groom walk around the tables at the wedding breakfast they hand them out to each guest, usually from a decorated basket carried by the bride.

I love my nonna’s bonboniere but most of them were made in the 1980s and though beautiful they’re not to my taste and they wouldn’t match our wedding. So its up to my fiance and I to guide my nan and give her ideas on what we would like the bonboniere to look like. I would like to stick to the shapes that I remember my nonna creating but making them with a modern feel. No peach coloured flowers for me!

dsc_0014

My nan is making samples for my fiance and I to look at as I write. She has about 1000 wires to twist for the almond ‘twigs’ alone! They are already looking wonderful. Will post photos of the results.

Read Full Post »